Why Light the Candles on Sunnadi?

23 Samhain/Nov. 22

Rosadi/Tues.

Divine Lady Rosa

Oh, Madria Vicka, Jana of Courage, Strength and Valor, be with us.

May the Pure Stream of Your Virtues flow within me, in this world and in all the worlds to come.

~

Rebekah asks:

Is there a particular reason behind lighting them on Sundays/Sunnadis, and not on Lunadi leading up to the birth of the Daughter?

Dear Rebekah,

That is a good question, especially where Lunadi is the day of the Moon and the Holy Daughter is our Supernal Moon. So, in that way, the first lighting of the candles on Lunadi would make sense and I return to this idea at the end of this post.

As we know, in Christianity, each candle of the Advent Wreath is lit for the first time on a Sunday. Of course, Sunday is their holy day of the week and these candles are being lit in anticipation of the birth of the Divine Son.

For us, we weren’t sure, at first, which day would be our holy day of the week. Traditionally, Sat. has always been “Our Lady’s Day” in the Catholic Church and I liked that idea, but we seem to have gravitated towards Sunnadi/Sunday as being our Holy Day. This is the day when Janite priestesses tend to serve The Great Liturgy.

Great-Mother-Goddess-04

Another reason why Sunnadi has become our holy day is because it is the day of Madria Theia. She is the Jana Who represents the Divine Mother, the Supernal Sun. Her Name means Brilliant Light and She is the Jana of Illumination, all having to do with the Sun. The Sun is Her Symbol and Sunnadi is the day of the Sun. Candles, of course, are of the Element of Fire and are symbolic of the Sun.

Janites do not call this season Advent, rather, it is the Astrean Season which culminates on the Feast of the Fairy Maiden which is 28 Astrea/Dec. 25.

Advent, in the Christian Church, was originally a time of penance in preparation for the birth of the Son. In the Catholic Church, this is no longer a time of fasting, but in Orthodox Christianity, it is still a time of a strict fast.

For Janites and for the Lucienne Tradition (Lady of Light Chantry), rather than being a somber time of penance, the entire Season is a time of Joy. Our Sunwheel is Joy. Madria Theia is also the Jana of Joy. For Janites, the last lighting of the Sunwheel ends on Yule Eve, Mother’s Night, which symbolically signals the end of the Mother time of the year and the beginning of the Daughter time of the year.

So, the basic theme of the Sunwheel revolves around the Sun, of which the Supernal Moon is a gentle reflection. And we light it on Sunnadis not only because of the reasons mentioned above, but also because Sunnadi is our holy day in honor of the Supernal Sun, Herself.

We light them in the same way as the Advent Wreath in that we light the Green Candle of Wisdom, first. We will continue to light that candle during dinner time or early evening every night for the following week. On the next Sunnadi, we light the Yellow Candle of Hope and so two candles will be lit. This continues until all four candles are lit each night until Mother’s Night.

I hope this makes sense to you and answers your question. But, truly, if you find lighting the first candle on Lunnadi in anticipation of the birth of the Holy Daughter to be more appropriate, I would certainly support that as a valid Tradition considering the fact that we are anticipating the Appearance of the Supernal Moon!!!!

Thank you!

May Our Lady bless you,

ArchMadria Candra Sophia

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KoreDi-Jana Tradition

The Janite Trinitarii Deanic Faith. Valid & legally ordained Janite Order of Priestesses

2 thoughts on “Why Light the Candles on Sunnadi?”

  1. This is really great to know! I suppose it does make sense that a “sunwheel” would be lit on our “sun” days, on Sunnadi. Thank you for this post!

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